Tuesday Evening
Introductory Level Classes
Buddhism 101

Tuesday evenings
October 5-26
7-8:15pm

$12 | No cost for members

Many question marks, in different colours

Buddhism 101
We all have questions about life. Perhaps the questions have gone unanswered or are not quite formed. They feel like big questions, such as what happens after death, why do bad things happen to good people, and why is there so much suffering? The answers to these lie in an understanding of the mind. In this series we will explore and meditate on both the questions and the answers.

These classes are perfect for beginners, and also those more experienced. You may attend any or all of the classes. Everybody is welcome!

This series of classes has limited in-person attendance available, as well as an online option. For information about the safety measures we'll be practising, please see our Membership page (click here). To register to attend this class in-person, see the Registration section below. Please note that numbers are limited, and we register on a first-come, first-served basis.



Registration

Please click on one of the links with each class title to register. (For the classes below, you have a choice of online or in-person attendance.)
*Recordings will be available for those who attend online, for 24 hours for weekly classes, and for 48 hours for Saturday events. Please note that recordings will not be available for those who attend in-person. Please also note that refunds are not possible at this time.


Tuesday Oct. 5
Why think about death?


ONLINE registration click here

IN-PERSON registration click here

Tuesday Oct. 12
Do future lives exist?


ONLINE registration click here

IN-PERSON registration click here

Tuesday Oct. 19
Is it luck, chance, or karma?


ONLINE registration click here

IN-PERSON registration click here

Tuesday Oct. 26
Do enlightened beings exist?


ONLINE registration click here

IN-PERSON registration click here

To register for a monthly membership
Please click here
Coming up this month

As conscientious Dharma practitioners, we should observe our own shortcomings instead of being preoccupied with those of other people. 
Venerable Geshe Kelsang Gyatso Rinpoche
Universal Compassion